Why Visit The North of England?

Up North!

Up North!

London is often the place to go to for a plethora of attractions and things to do, but most of the UK are just too far away to travel down to England’s capital for just one day and need things to do more locally.

The north of England features many cities and locations that have plenty on offer for great days out, most of which that would entertain the whole family.

Here is just a small selection of the options available when considering a day out in the North.

 

Cheshire and the North West

Staring over in the west, Cheshire is home to many picturesque locations, as well as places to visit. One such institution is the Blue Planet Aquarium based in Ellesmere Port which has an endless selection of sea life and creatures to see and includes a 3.8 million litre (880,000 gallons) Caribbean Reef that can be viewed through a 70 metre long underwater tunnel.

Blue Planet can boast that they have the largest collection of sharks in display in Europe, which includes the three-metre long Sand Tiger shark, whilst also having many reptiles and other wildlife on display. There is also the opportunity to go diving into the aquarium and go swimming with the sharks for those brave enough.

Ferry Across The Mersey!

Ferry Across The Mersey!

Moving just over the other side of the River Mersey, we get to Liverpool, home of The Beatles.

As one of the biggest British bands, The Beatles certainly left their mark on the City that spawned them into giant success and as a result have a museum dedicated to the ‘Fab Four’.

The Beatles Story as it is known goes chronologically through the band’s history, starting with the event that changed everything: the day Paul McCartney met John Lennon at Woolton Village fete in the late 1950s.

Other stops through the tour see you have a look at the famous Abby Road studios, the Cavern Club and even a chance for an underwater adventure in the Yellow Submarine.

Yorkshire

Beautiful York!

Beautiful York!

We now come to the humble surroundings of Yorkshire and its four districts. North Yorkshire is home to its namesake, York, as well as the Jorvik Viking centre.

Based in the centre of the city, the Jorvik museum allows for the opportunity to witness the excavations which first saw York open up to its Viking history and how people used to live 1,000 years ago.

Over in the outskirts of Leeds, meanwhile, is another piece of history in the form of Harewood House which is home to the Queen’s cousin the Earl of Harewood and offers welcome contrast to the modern flats and apartment buildings in the city centre.

The house allows visitors to see spectacular architecture and impressive items of furniture, as well as exquisite porcelain and art collections.

The home’s lush gardens are also a main feature not to be missed, especially on a fine, sunny day. Sporting wonderfully maintained plants and flowers, as well as a beautiful cascading waterfall, the gardens make for a perfect picnic location.

Durham

Durham Cathederal

Durham Cathederal

Going further north and out of Yorkshire, Durham has become a tourist bound location thanks to the town’s wonderful cathedral.

The building has gained iconic status in the north east of England with its Norman based architecture and is one of the finest examples remaining in Europe. The main areas that will need exploring are the Shrine of Cuthbert and the traditions of St Benedict, with both having high historical importance.

About the author: Sam writes for GranaryWharf.co.uk Leeds Flats where you can search for various 1 bedroom flats in Leeds.

 

 

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One Response to Why Visit The North of England?

  1. Hannah says:

    Some of my favourite places – especially York. Although I must say you have missed out quite a lot in the North West, there! What about Manchester and Chester? You could write an entire page about things to do in both!

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